Book Review: Clean Architecture

This book is a must read for any serious software developer. It gives a high-level overview of software development that is missing from other more code-oriented books. The primary focus is on Object-Oriented Programming and how we build systems that are maintainable, flexible, extendable and correct. But the approach is high-level so not many code examples.

At 321 pages and 34 chapters, it is not the most extensive book, and it is an easy read because so much of the advice makes perfect sense. But it still has so much depth that I think it can be read multiple times to get all the nuggets of wisdom.

A different view on the book is from Blaine Osepchuk. The only criticism I have of the book is that some of the chapters feel more like intros and does not cover the theme adequately.

I have collected my notes from the book here for all to benefit. But the notes do not give the book the needed credit so please take the time to read it.

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Book Review: C# 7.0 in a Nutshell

The latest update in the C# in a Nutshell series, it obviously covers C# 7.0. With 1037 pages it is a massive volume, most of it can be used as a reference book, and many of the chapters are not important unless you have very specific needs. The topic in each chapter is covered in significant detail, you will be hard-pressed to find a detail that is not covered I think.

It can be read, cover to cover, but I would recommend to read the first 4 chapters and pick from the remaining based on interest or need. The detail level and reference book type of writing make the book dry to read, so be warned!

My notes from the book are collected here, I hope they will be useful to someone.

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Book Review: Professional ASP.NET MVC 5

The book is published in 2014 so it is starting to show some age. Even though ASP.NET MVC 5 is the last version until it changed the name to ASP.NET MVC Core which is in version 2, see the version history here. So why read a four year old book? Many projects still use MVC 5 and it allowed me to gain an overview of the technology before diving into MVC Core. Unless you have a particular interest in MVC 5 I would recommend a book about MVC Core instead.

At 624 pages and 17 chapters, I read it in a couple of weeks. It does start to show it’s age when referencing jQuery and AngularJS, it is rather old versions mentioned. But the chapters about the MVC framework are sound and contains a good walkthrough about each main feature of the framework. If you need a primer on MVC 5 I will recommend it.

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